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Bursting with feeling, “Fortunate Son” expresses its original meaning all the more vividly in this unplugged cover by Ryan Kinder.

This classic bit of Credence Clearwater Revival material feels as fitting as ever, dusted off and re-imagined for our current crowd. It’s an elegant reworking of the song for our modern age – confronting old issues with new verve.

Where CCR left off, Ryan picks up, but quietly. He’s less forceful and more contemplative. The edge is off but the bottle’s still open.

“Some folks are born made to wave the flag.”

Amber streaks across the sidewalk as an empty bottle fills with dawn.

You nod on the bus as red spray, earthen trenches and downed statues erupt at imagination’s edge. Your stop crawls into view.

Reality confronts your eyes – littered streets, colorless alleys and an ambulating mob.

Wars wage each day in more ways than one. Life, yours, goes on.

“No, it ain’t me. I ain’t no fortunate one.”

A down-tempo lounge-adapted interpretation of CCR with shuffling drums and upright bass? This is a real revival if ever there was one.

Kinder’s “Fortunate Son” stands as testament to the immutable meaning of great music. Decades gone by and this song still speaks volumes on our world’s state of affairs.

Ryan’s take set’s this song squarely in the present tense, with less intense vocals yet no fewer feels. His voice melds well with the acoustic instruments in use; climbing up only briefly at each chorus before settling back into the swing of things.

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There’s a somber sort of gravitas to Ryan’s intonation; a consoling feel quite unlike the original. The extra emotion gives an already emotive track dual purpose – disclosing injustice and atoning for it. It ruffles feathers then smooths them out again.

Give this a spin for a mellow reminder of how the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Need more music? Check out our post on Jack Grace’s “Us”!